Research

Research Projects & Papers

Research Project

  • KIMURA, Fukunari

    Economic integration in Asia: Outlook and challenges

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Asia-Pacific

    AUTHOR : 
    KIMURA, Fukunari

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Fukunari KIMURA, Professor, Keio University & Chief Economist, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA)

     

    Research outline:

    Our goal is to provide a platform for discussion on the future of the free trade system in light of the ever-changing international environment caused by circumstances such as the COVID-19 pandemic. As the U.S.-China trade war, progress in the digital economy, and other aspects that have a strong impact on the overseas business development of multinational corporations are evolving at a rapid pace, our symposium also takes into account the latest information relevant for business activities.

  • GOTO, Kenta

    Business in Asia and SDGs implementation

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Asia-Pacific

    AUTHOR : 
    GOTO, Kenta

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Kenta GOTO, Professor, Faculty of Economics, Kansai University

     

    Research outline:

    SDGs achievement and the development of sustainable supply chains are of critical importance when devising business strategies in Asia. This research aims to investigate “sustainable business creation” while understanding the “goal trade-offs” in relation to SDGs. Moreover, we aim to raise awareness in order to accelerate SDGs implementation throughout the supply chains of companies in the Kansai region.

  • MORIYA, Takashi

    Cooperating with Asian human resources

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Asia-Pacific

    AUTHOR : 
    MORIYA, Takashi

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Takashi MORIYA, Professor, College of Business Administration, Ritsumeikan University

     

    Research outline:

    This research focuses on Asian human resources of different nationalities (India, Vietnam, Singapore, etc.). Following the example of previous initiatives implemented overseas and in Japan, we will conduct a survey which will allow us to make recommendations for Japanese companies on how to improve their capacity to attract and cooperate with Asian talent.

  • INADA, Yoshihisa

    Kansai as an advanced inbound tourism destination: Towards a sustainable tourism strategy

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Japan and Kansai economy

    AUTHOR : 
    INADA, Yoshihisa

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Yoshihisa INADA, Director of Research & Director of Center for Quantitative Economic Analysis, Asia Pacific Institute of Research (APIR)

     

    Research outline:

    The COVID-19 pandemic proved to be a turning point for the inbound tourism industry. As an alternative to mass tourism, we need to develop a strategy that focuses on high added value in order to maximize tourists’ expenditure per capita. In order to prepare for the post-pandemic era, we analyze the current situation of inbound tourism in Kansai and identify its main challenges. In addition, we aim to create a “brand power” index for tourist destinations which will contribute directly to stimulating inbound tourism demand.

  • SHIMOJO, Shinji

    Comprehensive digital transformation in Kansai and Osaka

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Japan and Kansai economy

    AUTHOR : 
    SHIMOJO, Shinji

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Shinji SHIMOJO, Professor & Director of the Cybermedia Center, Osaka University

     

    Research outline:

    The COVID-19 pandemic exposed once again Japan’s slow digital transformation (DX), but it also created an opportunity to push for more digitalization in both the public and private sectors. This research identifies the challenges posed by the comprehensive digital transformation of cities, as well as their solutions. Our goal is to propose a “regulatory framework and its implementation procedure” that will ensure a more effective digital transformation in Kansai and Osaka.

  • YAMORI, Nobuyoshi

    Challenges in supporting businesses by Kansai’s regional financial institutions: The Role of regional finances in the post-pandemic era

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Japan and Kansai economy

    AUTHOR : 
    YAMORI, Nobuyoshi

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Nobuyoshi YAMORI, Professor, Research Institute for Economics and Business Administration, Kobe University

     

    Research outline:

    Small and medium-sized businesses, which rely on the regional financial system, were particularly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Under these circumstances, regional financial institutions need to improve their ability to evaluate a business’s potential for growth accurately. The purpose of this research is to identify, analyze, and disseminate the best practices of regional financial institutions, as well as to point out issues and necessary actions to promote a finance system complying with ESG criteria.

  • MATSUBAYASHI, Yoichi

    Developing and applying a new market sentiment index based on text data

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Economic forecast and analysis

    AUTHOR : 
    MATSUBAYASHI, Yoichi

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Yoichi MATSUBAYASHI, Professor, Faculty of Economics, Kobe University

     

    Research outline:

    Our goal is to develop a forecasting system which enables us to understand the macroeconomic trends in real time by using the “text data” provided by fast media reports. We hope that this system will be used by research institutes and companies for economic forecast and analysis, as well as business planning.

  • TAKABAYASHI, Kikuo

    Creating and using the 2015 Kansai inter-regional input-output table

    Research Projects

    Research Project » 2021FiscalYear » Economic forecast and analysis

    AUTHOR : 
    TAKABAYASHI, Kikuo

    ABSTRACT

    Research leader:

    Kikuo TAKABAYASHI, Professor, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University

     

    Research outline:

    The inter-regional input-output table allows us to analyze the economic ripple effect caused by inter-regional trade structures and regional interdependence. By focusing on the Greater Kansai area* and by integrating the results of a preliminary survey conducted among residents and visitors to the Kansai region, we obtained a table which offers a more realistic view of the situation**. This fiscal year, we are planning to analyze the ripple effect of the tourism industry, which was hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    *Greater Kansai area includes the following eight prefectures: Fukui, Mie, Shiga, Kyoto, Osaka, Hyogo, Nara, Wakayama, Tottori, and Tokushima.

    **The input-output table targets every year whose number ends in “0” or “5”, leading to a time lag of approximately five years between the target year and the publication year. As of March 2021, we have almost finished collecting the 2015 data for every Kansai prefecture, and based on it we will create the “2015 Kansai inter-regional input-output table”.

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Policy Brief

Since its establishment in 2011, the Asia Pacific Institute of Research has been active in conducting research projects, publishing books by leading specialists, issuing annual publications, and circulating research findings through reports, forums and symposiums.

Building on these activities, APIR is now launching the APIR Policy Brief series. APIR Policy Briefs offer expert analysis and concrete proposals that are timely and relevant to some of the major issues facing Japan and the Asia Pacific region today. Each policy brief will focus on one topic, providing insightful discussion of the problems and possibilities and carrying a clear message for future policy direction. Our aim is to make useful contributions to the policy process both directly and indirectly, through regional and national governments, the business community, and other stakeholders.

Authors include Toshihiko Hayashi, APIR’s Research Director and emeritus professor of economics at Osaka University, and other senior and resident researchers. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of APIR on any of the policy questions concerned. The APIR Policy Brief series aims to stimulate thoughtful and open-minded policy debate within Japan, the Asia Pacific region and beyond. We welcome comments by email to pbrief@apir.or.jp .

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The empirical and analytical research we produce is based on independent study or the work of research groups within the Institute. We consult and collaborate with a wide range of partners, with the goal of to deepening research and enriching policy debates in the future. The views expressed in the papers we publish are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of APIR.

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Commentary papers offer insightful discussions of the very latest socio-economic and policy issues, while special Trend Watch reports are published monthly, each focusing on a specific topic. Discussion Papers provide detailed empirical research on major issues, and Analysis Reports include up-to-the-minute data on current economic trends .

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APIR provides weekly and monthly assessments of current economic conditions and future outlooks for the United States and Japan. We also provide detailed quarterly predictions for the economies of Kansai and Japan.

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  • HAYASHI, Toshihiko

    Population as a Source of Long−Term Growth: From Malthus to Japan’s Postmodern Regime

    Discussion Papers

    Discussion Paper » Discussion Paper

     / DATE : 

    AUTHOR : 
    HAYASHI, Toshihiko

    ABSTRACT

    This paper introduces a simple macroeconomic time series model incorporating a key concept of  GDP elasticity with respect to population (population elasticity). Using this model, we conducted empirical analyses of 158 countries each covering 25 to 180 years of history. As a result, we found first that the estimated population elasticity demarcated the countries according to regime, showing clearly whether a country was in the ‘Malthusian regime’, in the ‘modern growth regime’ or in the ‘postmodern regime’. We found that the poorest countries as well as some oil-rich countries were in the Malthusian regime. The modern growth regime prevailed in most European, Asian and American countries in the 20th century. We then predicted long-term real GDP for each country while they stayed in modern growth regimes. Third, we observed that both Germany and Japan went into a postmodern regime after a demographic transformation. Focusing on Japan, we argued that if the nation remained in the modern growth regime, it would face a precipitous decline in GDP. We suggested that Japan must reduce dependence on population as a source of growth in the postmodern era. This lesson might be important for the two thirds of countries in the world that are expected to enter a postmodern regime around the middle of this century.

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    HAYASHI, Toshihiko

    Population as a Source of Long−Term Growth: From Malthus to Japan’s Postmodern Regime

    Discussion Papers

    Discussion Paper » Discussion Paper

     / DATE : 

    AUTHOR : 
    HAYASHI, Toshihiko

    ABSTRACT

    This paper introduces a simple macroeconomic time series model incorporating a key concept of  GDP elasticity with respect to population (population elasticity). Using this model, we conducted empirical analyses of 158 countries each covering 25 to 180 years of history. As a result, we found first that the estimated population elasticity demarcated the countries according to regime, showing clearly whether a country was in the ‘Malthusian regime’, in the ‘modern growth regime’ or in the ‘postmodern regime’. We found that the poorest countries as well as some oil-rich countries were in the Malthusian regime. The modern growth regime prevailed in most European, Asian and American countries in the 20th century. We then predicted long-term real GDP for each country while they stayed in modern growth regimes. Third, we observed that both Germany and Japan went into a postmodern regime after a demographic transformation. Focusing on Japan, we argued that if the nation remained in the modern growth regime, it would face a precipitous decline in GDP. We suggested that Japan must reduce dependence on population as a source of growth in the postmodern era. This lesson might be important for the two thirds of countries in the world that are expected to enter a postmodern regime around the middle of this century.

    PDF